All The World’s a Stage and Now We’re All on it Together

 

 Indeed, the darker side globalization has precipitated a number of worldwide crises and negative outcomes that affect populations from the Australian outback to the Maldives and the shores of the United States and we no loner have the luxury of ignorance, apathy  or inertia.

But the designation of “crisis” is in fact determined by the media a criteria

To be sure, Cottle is correct in stating that, “Notable studies of national news inflection of global events of how national and international public spheres condition each other, and how the Internet, for example, is now facilitating transnational networks and interventions within the circuits and flows of communicative power all hold considerable relevance for understanding global crisis communications.”  Even within the US, we can’t agree on the degree to which terrorism is a “crisis. Elections can be won and lost on what various constituents’ understanding of what constitutes a “crisis.” 

But this have been standard operating procedure for decades and is in fact part and parcel of American foreign policy particularly as it pertains to developing countries of no strategic consequence and the sliding scale of areas deemed. Has so many years past that we have forgotten the shameful ignominious Rwandan genocide and its inexcusable aftermath? Where not even victims been massacred in churches and body-clogged rivers could shame or rouse the international community into action. How doe we explain the deafening silence of the media shortly before or in the wake of and their abject failure to call world attention as a matter of immediate importance until things had degenerated far beyond all imaginings. Consider too that the French government and leaders and perpetrators of the genocide paid attention to media reporting which resulted in a decrease in the mass killings. 

We no longer have the luxury of impenetrable, self-constructed ivory towers and the sooner world powers get hip to that fact the better for the world’s populations. I like Beck’s idea of “Enforced Enlightenment” and “Cosmopolitan Realism.” No doubt the cumulative effects of much ballyhooed modernization and other consequences of conspicuous mass consumption and rampant marketization  calls for an collaborative approach of shared principles and ethics of behavior and thought. As Cottle explains many of these world crisis should prompt Cooperation and Coordinated Response and Transnational Reflexivity, but a prerequisite is philosophical mindset that put these concepts in motion, particularly in Western nations and International Organizations. Despite protestations otherwise, this has yet to happen on a substantial scale. 

Cottle says, “how proliferating and intensifying global crises become constituted and conditioned on the world’s news stage and thereby further processes of global interdependency and a growing sense of globality, is now, or should be, of more central concern, “ and I agree.  More and more the “Them” has become “Us.” It’s absolute essential that a transnational “cosmopolitan vision,” be created with the cognizance that we are increasingly a global community with interconnected fates and outcomes. International media, particularly Western outlets, play a central role in helping to increase and broaden society’s understanding of  world crises, events and issues as they unfold. With their unprecedented access, resource, power,  the media are the lens through which the world comes to know and empathize with the unknowable “others” on the other side of the world. 

 Indeed, the darker side globalization has precipitated a number of worldwide crises and negative outcomes that affect populations from the Australian outback to the Maldives and the shores of the United States and we no loner have the luxury of ignorance, apathy  or inertia.

 

But the designation of “crisis” is in fact determined by the media a criteria

To be sure, Cottle is correct in stating that, “Notable studies of national news inflection of global events of how national and international public spheres condition each other, and how the Internet, for example, is now facilitating transnational networks and interventions within the circuits and flows of communicative power all hold considerable relevance for understanding global crisis communications.”  Even within the US, we can’t agree on the degree to which terrorism is a “crisis. Elections can be won and lost on what various constituents’ understanding of what constitutes a “crisis.” 

 

But this have been standard operating procedure for decades and is in fact part and parcel of American foreign policy particularly as it pertains to developing countries of no strategic consequence and the sliding scale of areas deemed. Has so many years past that we have forgotten the shameful ignominious Rwandan genocide and its inexcusable aftermath? Where not even victims been massacred in churches and body-clogged rivers could shame or rouse the international community into action. How doe we explain the deafening silence of the media shortly before or in the wake of and their abject failure to call world attention as a matter of immediate importance until things had degenerated far beyond all imaginings. Consider too that the French government and leaders and perpetrators of the genocide paid attention to media reporting which resulted in a decrease in the mass killings. 

 

 

We no longer have the luxury of impenetrable, self-constructed ivory towers and the sooner world powers get hip to that fact the better for the world’s populations. I like Beck’s idea of “Enforced Enlightenment” and “Cosmopolitan Realism.” No doubt the cumulative effects of much ballyhooed modernization and other consequences of conspicuous mass consumption and rampant marketization  calls for an collaborative approach of shared principles and ethics of behavior and thought. As Cottle explains many of these world crisis should prompt Cooperation and Coordinated Response and Transnational Reflexivity, but a prerequisite is philosophical mindset that put these concepts in motion, particularly in Western nations and International Organizations. Despite protestations otherwise, this has yet to happen on a substantial scale. 

 

 

Cottle says, “how proliferating and intensifying global crises become constituted and conditioned on the world’s news stage and thereby further processes of global interdependency and a growing sense of globality, is now, or should be, of more central concern, “ and I agree.  More and more the “Them” has become “Us.” It’s absolute essential that a transnational “cosmopolitan vision,” be created with the cognizance that we are increasingly a global community with interconnected fates and outcomes. International media, particularly Western outlets, play a central role in helping to increase and broaden society’s understanding of  world crises, events and issues as they unfold. With their unprecedented access, resource, power,  the media are the lens through which the world comes to know and empathize with the unknowable “others” on the other side of the world.

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About inteltakeover

This blog is written and maintained by of a group of graduate students in the International Communication program at American University's School of International Service.
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